Year A – Lent 4 – Ephesians 5:8-14

Ephesians 5:8–14 – For once you were darkness, but now in the Lord you are light. Live as children of light— 9 for the fruit of the light is found in all that is good and right and true. 10 Try to find out what is pleasing to the Lord. 11 Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them. 12 For it is shameful even to mention what such people do secretly; 13 but everything exposed by the light becomes visible, 14 for everything that becomes visible is light. Therefore it says, “Sleeper, awake! Rise from the dead, and Christ will shine on you.”

Summary – Paul contrasts the life of pagans prior to Christ with their new life “in Him.” They were darkness, but now they are light. He urges them to live this way. He explains that the fruit of the light is found in all that is good and right and true. He urges these believers not to participate in the unfruitful works of darkness, rather show them for what they really are. Things become visible in the light.

Insight – The Epistle reading picks up the theme of light which is also in the Gospel this week. We are all “born blind” like the man in John 9. We can all say, one thing I know, whereas I was blind, but now I see (also in Amazing Grace). St. Paul exhorts us as those who have been given sight, to walk as children of Light. He grounds this on the truth that, “Now you are Light in the Lord.” We are Light, even if before we were darkness. Now let us live like it. Open the windows, remove the shades, step into the Sun. Let the light shine and put away darkness and dark deeds. Notice the promise at the end in v 14, “Awake, sleeper, And arise from the dead, And Christ will shine on you.”

Children’s Catechism – How are we to live? We are to live as children of the light.

Discussion – What would it mean for you to walk more in the light?

Prayer – [Collect for Purity] Almighty God, unto whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hid; Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of thy Holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love thee, and worthily magnify thy holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

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Year A – Epiphany 5 – Matthew 5:13-20

Matthew 5:13–20 – “You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how can its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything, but is thrown out and trampled under foot. 14 “You are the light of the world. A city built on a hill cannot be hid. 15 No one after lighting a lamp puts it under the bushel basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all in the house. 16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father in heaven. 17 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. 18 For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished. 19 Therefore, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches others to do the same, will be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. 20 For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

Summary – This passage can be summarized in three main points: 1) As a kingdom disciple, you must not become a moron (v13). His people are illustrated with two vivid pictures: salt and light. Salt in manifold in its mean. It preserves and flavors food, among other things. During the time of Jesus, salt soil contained many impurities. The actual “salt” (sodium chloride) could dissolve and it was of no use. Salt was a common wisdom image and so the words used for “lost it’s taste” also means to “make foolish” (moraino). The Church is to have an antiseptic and savory influence in society. 2) As a kingdom disciple, you must shine (vv14-16). We are mirrors of the light of Christ. Christ is the very personification of light (John 8:12). All who catch and reflect the light of Christ are themselves called “light” (Eph. 5:8). At least three biblical images arise for the function of light: a) Light dispels darkness (John 1:4-5). b) Light gives guidance (Ps. 119:130). c) Light reveals the reality of sin (Ps. 90:8). 3) As a kingdom disciple, you must stand on the authority of God’s Word in its fulness (vv17-20). The authority of the Old Covenant written Word is not diminished by the Messianic age, but the incompleteness is filled (Heb. 1:1-2). Jesus did this by fulfilling the types and shadows of the old covenant, the “ceremonial law” and the narrative of Israel’s story (Col. 2:17).  Since, we find that many such laws have passed away, e.g., “Thus he declared all foods clean” (Mark 7:19) – this “fulfillment” is related directly to the cross (temple veil torn) and resurrection (new creation) of Christ (2Cor. 5:17; Is. 65). He brought a new “heavens and earth” of the new covenant, and thus, the Torah of Israel has passed away (Gal. 3). We are to affirm the absolute authority of the Word fulfilled in Jesus. In this our righteousness must exceed that of the religious leaders of Israel, scribes and Pharisees.

Insight – When disciples are saline in a bland and rotting world, this comes through in all aspects of our lifestyle, our relationships with neighbors, the service we render in the workplace.  Our faith therefore must be visible in the way we treat family, friends, coworkers, how way we treat our employees or serve our employer, even in how we drive our car.

Discussion – How salty are you? Are you shining the light? Are you standing on the Word of God fulfilled in Christ? Does Christ call for an excessively high standard of righteousness (exceeding the scribes and Pharisees? [No, their righteousness was skin-deep and they were hypocrites (Matt. 23).]

Prayer – Set us free, O God, from the bondage of our sins, and give us the liberty of that abundant life which you have made known to us in your Son our Savior Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. (BCP Ephany 5)

Year A – Epiphany 2 – Isaiah 49:1-7

Isaiah 49:1–7  – Listen to me, O coastlands, pay attention, you peoples from far away! The LORD called me before I was born, while I was in my mother’s womb he named me. 2 He made my mouth like a sharp sword, in the shadow of his hand he hid me; he made me a polished arrow, in his quiver he hid me away. 3 And he said to me, “You are my servant, Israel, in whom I will be glorified.” 4 But I said, “I have labored in vain, I have spent my strength for nothing and vanity; yet surely my cause is with the LORD, and my reward with my God.”   5 And now the LORD says, who formed me in the womb to be his servant, to bring Jacob back to him, and that Israel might be gathered to him, for I am honored in the sight of the LORD, and my God has become my strength— 6 he says, “It is too light a thing that you should be my servant to raise up the tribes of Jacob and to restore the survivors of Israel; I will give you as a light to the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.”   7 Thus says the LORD, the Redeemer of Israel and his Holy One, to one deeply despised, abhorred by the nations, the slave of rulers, “Kings shall see and stand up, princes, and they shall prostrate themselves, because of the LORD, who is faithful, the Holy One of Israel, who has chosen you.”

Summary – This important Servant song in Isaiah points beyond Israel collectively, since this Servant will “raise up the tribes of Jacob and to restore the survivors of Israel” (v6). The first part of this passage addresses the origin of the Servant. Yahweh predestined the Servant to be one with a mouth like a sharp sword (Rev. 19), like a unique arrow to be drawn at the decisive moment of battle. But the Servant expresses frustration, laboring in vain (v4). This certainly fits with the earthly ministry of Jesus. He was humbled as One “deeply despised, abhorred by the nations, the slave of rulers” (v7). Nevertheless true Israel will be gathered to this Israelite Servant (v5). He will be a light to the nations. This phrase, light to the nations, found here and in Is. 42:6, is cited in the New Testament in two places. In the first use of the passage, Simeon who sees the infant Jesus utters that He will be “a light for revelation to the Gentiles and for glory to your people Israel” (Lk. 2:32). This is to be expected. But in the ministry of Paul, he also cites this on the occasion of the rejection of the gospel by Jews and their decided turning to the Gentiles. He applies this to the  apostolic calling, “For so the Lord has commanded us, saying, ‘I have set you to be a light for the Gentiles, so that you may bring salvation to the ends of the earth’” (Acts 13:47).

Insight – We have a cabinet over the washing machine and there are spare light bulbs in it. If I grabbed one, I should not expect it to be to be hot or glowing. It is a perfectly functional bulb, but it won’t make light without a connection. Isaiah 49, along with its application and fulfillment in the New Testament, make clear that the people of God are also light in the world. Because Jesus was the light of the world, now we who are his Body in the world are also instruments of His light. We are instruments or even bulbs of that light, but we don’t have that light of ourselves. In the same way that the light bulb cannot produce light without being connected to the power of electricity, so we cannot shine with the light of Christ without union with Him. As we live in faith in Jesus, His power shines through us.

Child’s Catechism – What was the Servant of Isaiah to do? The Servant of Isaiah was to suffer and die to be the light of the world.

Discussion – How can we practice being better lights in the world?

Prayer – Almighty God, whose Son our Savior Jesus Christ is the light of the world: Grant that your people, illumined by your Word and Sacraments, may shine with the radiance of Christ’s glory, that he may be known, worshiped, and obeyed to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, now and for ever. Amen. (BCP Epiphany 2)

Year A – Epiphany – Matthew 2:1-12

Matthew 2:1–12  – In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, 2 asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.” 3 When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; 4 and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. 5 They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet: 6 ‘And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd my people Israel.’” 7 Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. 8 Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, “Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage.” 9 When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. 10 When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. 11 On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. 12 And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another road.

Summary – Most Christians are familiar with the story of Magi coming from the East. We often see the icon’s three kings on camels at this time of year, though the text here does not specify three. In our nostalgic view of Christmas we picture three kings bowing to the newborn Jesus, along with animals and shepherds, and sometimes Santa Claus. The real story is much more dramatic that Christmas pageants. The Gospel of Luke, written to a Rome-wide audience, contrasts the birth of Jesus with the claim of Caesar Augustus claiming to be a god (Lk. 2). But in Matthew (written to Jews) the contrast is between the infamous Herod the Great, titled by Rome as “King of the Jews” (39 BC), and the actual King of the Jews, the Messiah to all nations. Herod the Great is a study in a wicked ruler; he was hated by the Jews of his day. He had many people killed, even his  (favorite) wife and some of his own children. However, he was a major player on the world scene at this time.  He presented many costly presents for the likes of Julius Caesar, Antony, Cleopatra, and most of all, Augustus (Octavius) Caesar. Matthew makes clear that through the prophecies of the Scriptures the birth place of the Messiah could be known and possibly the general time (Mic. 5:2; Dan. 9:24ff). When the Magi found Jesus, probably 1-2 years old at the time (after Jesus was born, v1). They knelt down and worshiped Him and gave Him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. God warned them against the evil of Herod and they “went home by another way.” The Magi event is one of the major themes of Epiphany because it is the first hint that the true King of the Jews is actually the Savior of all Nations, the Light of the world.

Insight – There is a well-known song about the visit of the Magi, “We Three Kings” which was written by an Episcopal minster, John Henry Hopkins, Jr. in 1852. The insight that Hopkins put to poetry was that the gifts given have symbolic significance. “Born a King on Bethlehem’s plain,  Gold I bring to crown Him again.” Gold symbolizes Christ’s kingship. “Frankincense to offer have I; Incense owns a Deity nigh.” This aromatic resin was often used in the worship of gods. Finally, a very interesting observation on the last gift. “Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume
Breathes a life of gathering gloom; Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying, Sealed in the stone cold tomb.” The last verse of this carol has reference to the resurrection: “Glorious now behold Him arise; King and God and sacrifice.” (To hear my new version of the tune of this hymn, go here.)

Child’s Catechism – What did the Magi bring to Jesus? Gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

Discussion – Many believe the Magi were Persian wise men and star gazers (e.g., from the areas where Daniel lived, current day Iraq). How do you think the Magi knew about Christ?

Prayer – O God, by the leading of a star you manifested your only Son to the Peoples of the earth: Lead us, who know you now by faith, to your presence, where we may see your glory face to face; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. (BCP, Epiphany)

 

Year A – Epiphany – Ephesians 3:1-12

Ephesians 3:1–12 – This is the reason that I Paul am a prisoner for Christ Jesus for the sake of you Gentiles— 2 for surely you have already heard of the commission of God’s grace that was given me for you, 3 and how the mystery was made known to me by revelation, as I wrote above in a few words, 4 a reading of which will enable you to perceive my understanding of the mystery of Christ. 5 In former generations this mystery was not made known to humankind, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit: 6 that is, the Gentiles have become fellow heirs, members of the same body, and sharers in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel. 7 Of this gospel I have become a servant according to the gift of God’s grace that was given me by the working of his power. 8 Although I am the very least of all the saints, this grace was given to me to bring to the Gentiles the news of the boundless riches of Christ, 9 and to make everyone see what is the plan of the mystery hidden for ages in God who created all things; 10 so that through the church the wisdom of God in its rich variety might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places. 11 This was in accordance with the eternal purpose that he has carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, 12 in whom we have access to God in boldness and confidence through faith in him.

Summary – Paul makes plain to his audience that those who were not born as Jews physically, through Christ are now made part of one and the same body.  As spiritual “Jews,” Gentiles in Christ inherit the same promises as physical Jews because of the Gospel.  Paul had the responsibility and privilege of bringing this truth to light which was previously hidden.  Though it was “hidden,” there were many, many hints throughout the Old Testament, not the least of which is the face that the Davidic (and thus Messianic line) was passed through Tamar, probably a Canaanite woman, as well as Rahab (a Canaanite prostitute) and Ruth (a Moabite).  Inclusion of non-Jews was always God’s plan, but now, using Paul, this mystery was unveiled in its full glory!  This was to show God’s wisdom and instill confidence in His plans.  When the Gentile magi visited Christ, the Light of the World, the blessing of the Gospel to the whole world whether Jew or Gentile began to become clear.

Insight – Have you ever “house-sat”?  One of your friends goes on vacation and wants someone to watch their house for them while they’re away.  You’re given full run of the house, and it’s as if you live there.  Even though you are not actually the person the deed of the house was given to, you can use the house just as if you were the owner.  It is like that with the house of God.  God gave the “key” to His “house” or His “people” to the Jews, the sons of Abraham.  But when Christ came, He spread out the use of the key to both Jews AND Gentiles so that they could all freely come in and be a part of the House of God.  We are all now equal tenants, receiving of the same benefits and blessings!

Child Catechism – What kinds of people does God accepts?  All people, Jew or Gentile.

Discussion – List some other “hints” that Gentiles were to be included in the people of God.  Why does Paul say this truth was “hidden” before, if we see clear hints that God’s purpose was to include all peoples?

Prayer – Father, in this Epiphany week we thank you that in your wisdom you gave to us the revelation of your Only Son, that through Him we would become recipients of your promised Spirit through faith.  Fill us with joy and thankfulness this day, that your Gospel would go forth into the world, drawing in even more Gentiles into your house.  In Your Name we ask it, Amen.

Year A – Epiphany – Psalm 72:1-7, 10-14

Psalms 72:1–7, 10–14 – Give the king your justice, O God, and your righteousness to a king’s son. 2 May he judge your people with righteousness, and your poor with justice. 3 May the mountains yield prosperity for the people, and the hills, in righteousness. 4 May he defend the cause of the poor of the people, give deliverance to the needy, and crush the oppressor.   5 May he live while the sun endures, and as long as the moon, throughout all generations. 6 May he be like rain that falls on the mown grass, like showers that water the earth. 7 In his days may righteousness flourish and peace abound, until the moon is no more.   10 May the kings of Tarshish and of the isles render him tribute, may the kings of Sheba and Seba bring gifts. 11 May all kings fall down before him, all nations give him service.   12 For he delivers the needy when they call, the poor and those who have no helper. 13 He has pity on the weak and the needy, and saves the lives of the needy. 14 From oppression and violence he redeems their life; and precious is their blood in his sight.

Summary – Psalm 72 is a messianic Psalm and  a Psalm of David which looks to Solomon in the near future as a type of the Ultimate “King’s Son” (vs 1).  This Son will judge people righteously, and we recall the story of Solomon and the two women arguing over the child (1 Kings 3:16ff).  This Son will have dominion “from sea to sea” (vs 8), and Solomon indeed ruled all the land from the “River” to the sea (1 Kings 4:20ff), the allotted portion of Israel.  This Son would receive gifts from the “Kings of Sheba” (vs 10), and the “gold of Sheba will be given to him” (vs 15).  We remember the Queen of Sheba’s visit of course, in which she gave Solomon 120 talents of gold (1 Kings 10:10).  Solomon was however, as a typological shadow of Christ who was to come, an imperfect fulfillment of this Psalm.  Only Christ could be feared “as long as the sun and moon endure, throughout all generations” (vs 5).  Only Christ’s Kingdom can encompass the whole earth (vs. 8) and have “all kings” bow before Him (vs 11).  Only Christ could save “souls” (vs 13).  The final refrain of the Psalm in vss. 18-19 indeed points to the Lord alone as the doer of “wondrous things.”  Solomon was the second step in the line of David’s throne and kingship.  But we see here again, like we saw in Psalm 122 last week, that David’s throne came with an inherent aspect of longevity and eternality.  Christ the true Son of David is the ultimate fulfillment of that great line.

Insight – Does you ever feel like the world is ignoring God?  People try to take the meaning of Christmas away, and ignore Jesus’ coming, but King David tells us about the “king’s Son” who is expected.  This son of the King will become king and will be followed forever.  He was promised to be like rain that waters the earth, and would bring righteousness and peace.  As we look forward to Christmas, this promise about Jesus’ coming should give us great hope!  Jesus is “living water” (John 4:10) who “waters” those who have faith in Him, and the night of His birth, angels sang, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill toward men!” (Luke 2:14).  Though many people ignore the true King Jesus, His kingdom is everlasting and will finally submit all nations to it and His light shines in the world.

Child Catechism – How long will Jesus’ kingdom last?  Forever.

Discussion – How does Jesus “bring justice to the poor of the people”?  How does He “save the children of the needy”?

Prayer – Father God, God of Israel, who only does wondrous things, blessed be your glorious name forever.  This Advent season we earnestly pray that the whole earth be filled with your glory.  Amen.

Year A – Epiphany – Isaiah 60:1-6

Is 60:1–6 – “Arise, shine; for your light has come, and the glory of the LORD has risen upon you. 2 For darkness shall cover the earth, and thick darkness the peoples; but the LORD will arise upon you, and his glory will appear over you. 3 Nations shall come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn.   4 Lift up your eyes and look around; they all gather together, they come to you; your sons shall come from far away, and your daughters shall be carried on their nurses’ arms. 5 Then you shall see and be radiant; your heart shall thrill and rejoice, because the abundance of the sea shall be brought to you, the wealth of the nations shall come to you. 6 A multitude of camels shall cover you, the young camels of Midian and Ephah; all those from Sheba shall come. They shall bring gold and frankincense, and shall proclaim the praise of the LORD.”

Summary – The Lord, through the Prophet addresses the mother-city, Jerusalem, in this striking prophecy (using feminine pronouns, “you/your”). Though darkness has rested on the peoples and it all seems bleak, just then the Lord will shine over the city and people. The nations will be gathered into her. As they do so their abundance will come in as well, “the wealth of the nations shall come to you.” Even more the sons and daughters of Israel return. This text is perfectly placed as a prophetic glimpse of Epiphany. It refers to the star over Bethlehem, as well as the visit of the magi (Matt. 2).

Insight – Sometimes people get very down after the holidays. Do you ever feel a let down after New Years? Now it’s time to put shoe leather to your aspirations of new year’s resolutions and ambitions to change in the next year. Sometimes just getting back to the ordinary routine can get you down. Even more, January may not be your favorite time of year, it’s darker and colder with inclement weather. It seems like a long stretch until spring. The promises above came to God’s people in the worst kind of January, in truly the darkest time. It looks to a time of exile when the faithful had been scattered and when the nation had lost stability. It promises that abundance will come. It is an anchor that holds steady the ship of faith, saying, there will be a return to Zion, sons and daughters, nations renewed, abundance and all of this in a time of darkness. I believe this is fulfilled through Christ and the Church. Over history there have been multitudes of peoples from all kinds of nations who have come to follow Jesus. As they have been converted they bring their abundances in wealth, language, culture and music. All because of the One born in Bethlehem under starlight, visited by the Magi.

Catechism – What does Epiphany mean? Epiphany means the light of Jesus shining to all people.

Discussion – What are some things about this time of year that may seem sad or dark to you?

Prayer – O GOD, who by the leading of a star didst manifest thy only-begotten Son to the Gentiles; Mercifully grant that we, who know thee now by faith, may after this life have the fruition of thy glorious Godhead; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Year A – Epiphany 1 – Acts 10:34-43

Acts 10:34-43 – Then Peter began to speak to them: “I truly understand that God shows no partiality, 35 but in every nation anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him. 36 You know the message he sent to the people of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ—he is Lord of all. 37 That message spread throughout Judea, beginning in Galilee after the baptism that John announced: 38 how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power; how he went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him. 39 We are witnesses to all that he did both in Judea and in Jerusalem. They put him to death by hanging him on a tree; 40 but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, 41 not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. 42 He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. 43 All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”

Summary – Peter is addressing Cornelius and his household, speaking about how Jesus was anointed the Spirit, did miracles and died and rose again. Cornelius will become the first Gentile (and household) to become Christians. This fits one of the major themes of Epiphany – light to the nations, the gospel going to every place. But it had to start with someone, that someone outside Israel was Cornelius and his extended family (probably children, servants and other relatives). Peter needed to see that Gentiles as Gentiles can come into the Church, and not become Jews first (by circumcision as proselytes). Peter sees the Spirit baptize these uncircumcised Gentiles, so that he will give testimony that Gentiles do not need to be circumcised prior to baptism (see Acts 15). This becomes clear in the next two verses after our reading: Acts 10:44–45 – “While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit fell upon all those who were listening to the message. 45 All the circumcised believers who came with Peter were amazed, because the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles also.”

Insight – Have you ever watched a Jesus film? I have not seen many of them and I am always a little uncomfortable with the whole depiction of Jesus in film, anyway; but one serious problem is how Christ is shown after the resurrection. Many times Christ makes a mere appearance and has a kind of ghostly sheen. But look at Peter’s testimony: “God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses….” At first glance this sounds like the films get it right, Jesus magically appeared to a few people. But keep reading: “and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead.” They ate and drank with Jesus after the resurrection. The risen Jesus was no ghost, as He Himself assured the disciples. He was completely able to eat and drink in His resurrection body. In fact this is proof that the kingdom had come because Jesus said of the whole passover meal: Luke 22:16 – “I shall never again eat it until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God.” And He said of the cup: Matthew 26:29 – “But I say to you, I will not drink of this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink it new with you in My Father’s kingdom.” On Easter Sunday, Jesus  “had been made known to [the disciples on the Emmaus road]  in the breaking of the bread” (Luke 24:35). It was specifically the resurrection day eating and drinking that would confirm the kingdom had come in Christ and it was specifically in the breaking of bread that Jesus may be recognized. This is still true, Jesus has promised His presence in the bread and wine of the the Lord’s Supper.

Child’s Catechism – What did Jesus do to prove His kingdom had come? He ate and drank with the disciples after His resurrection.

Discussion – How is feasting a proof of the kingdom?

Prayer – O God, the risen Christ revealed himself to his disciples in the breaking of bread. Feed us with the bread of life and break open our hearts, that we may know him not only in the good news of the scriptures, but risen in the midst of your pilgrim people. Amen.