Year C – Second Sunday in Lent – Luke 13:31-35

Luke 13:31-35 (NRSV)

31 At that very hour some Pharisees came and said to him, “Get away from here, for Herod wants to kill you.” 32 He said to them, “Go and tell that fox for me, ‘Listen, I am casting out demons and performing cures today and tomorrow, and on the third day I finish my work.33 Yet today, tomorrow, and the next day I must be on my way, because it is impossible for a prophet to be killed outside of Jerusalem.’ 34 Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!35 See, your house is left to you. And I tell you, you will not see me until the time comes when you say, ‘Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord.’”

 

Summary – Jesus is teaching in the towns and villages of Galilee as he is going toward Jerusalem. The Pharisees tell Jesus to leave the area because Herod wants to kill him. Jesus says that he still has devils to cast out and healings to perform for the next three days, but he will be travelling toward Jerusalem during that time because it cannot be that a prophet should perish outside of Jerusalem. Jesus then laments over Jerusalem’s rejection of him and her coming destruction. His desire to love and protect the city is like that of a hen with her chicks, yet Jerusalem would have none of it. Before Jesus is rejected and the city is destroyed, Jesus will be received by them with praise, “Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord.”

Insight – Have you ever identified yourself with a character in a story? Perhaps in the Chronicles of Narnia, for example, you might identify with Lucy, or even Peter, or maybe Prince Caspian. How often though do you see yourself as Aslan? Probably very little.  As we read Luke 13:31-35, and we hear Jesus being confronted on all sides by his enemies, it is easy to identify with Jesus because he is the hero. He is our Lord, and we want to be like him. But this Lenten season, in order to help prepare your soul for Easter Sunday, try to identify yourself with Jesus’ persecutors and enemies, not with Jesus. As you hear these verses see yourself as that “Fox” Herod who wants to kill Jesus. See yourself as a shady hypocritical Pharisee who wants Jesus to depart from their regions and cease doing miracles. Or perhaps you are one of those who plot and scheme about how to destroy Jesus. Perhaps you are even one of the sick whom Jesus cures, or maybe even you are one of those of whom Jesus casts out devils. Are you Jerusalem, the city that rejects and kills the prophets and who will eventually even kill Jesus? Imagine Jesus telling you that you will reject him and kill him. See the tears running down Jesus’ face as he laments over you in great love. Feel the agonizing hypocrisy of betrayal as you greet him on Palm Sunday with shouts of praise, for in one weeks time you will precede his departure with shouts again, but this time saying,  “Crucify him, crucify him!”

This Lent, in order to have a deeper and more powerful resurrection with Christ, see yourself as the reason he was crucified to begin with. Come face to face with the reality of your fallen nature. Look intently on your hatred for God, and the evil in your heart. For then, when Christ is crucified, you will see those very sins nailed upon that cross. It is necessary that in order for us to see the cross as something done for us, we need to see the cross as something done by us. Only then will we be fit to join Christ in his resurrection on Easter morning.

Catechism – In which city did Jesus die? In Jerusalem, for it cannot be that a prophet perish outside of Jerusalem.

Discussion – Which character are you in this story? Why is Herod called a “Fox”? Were the Pharisees helping Jesus, or telling him to scram? Discuss how Jesus is like a hen, and Jerusalem like baby chicks.

Prayer – Almighty God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, bless us this Lenten season with hearts full of repentance. May we see our guilt in the crucifixion of our Lord, that we might faithfully receive its benefits for us.  In Jesus Name. Amen.

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