Year B – Proper 14 – Thee We Adore O Hidden Savior

Do you own anything that is a century or more old? Have you ever come into contact with something that one of your ancestors owned? Recently someone mentioned that they came into possession of a Bible (German) that was printed in the 1700s and was owned by their first ancestor that came to America. These experiences connect us to the past and makes history a little more real. As Christians we should regularly be reminded of those that have gone before, whether it is by the characters of the Bible or great leaders from Church History. Our music should remind us of this as we draw from very old hymns. Through singing the words of our forefathers we are connected with the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church which we acknowledge.

In this case, we are beginning to learn the hymn – Thee We Adore O Hidden Savior. This was written by the famous Medieval Theological, Thomas Aquinas (1226-1274) originally – Ado­ro Te de­vo­te, la­tens Dei­tas); trans­lat­ed from La­tin to Eng­lish by James R. Wood­ford, 1850. Sometimes our view of medieval men is very dim and perhaps we think that Christian sentiment would be very different today. But consider this verse penned by Aquinas which seems as devotionally fresh today as ever. It speaks of the cleansing blood of Christ and knowing the peace of His presence.

Fountain of gladness, Jesu, Lord and God,
Cleanse us, unclean, with Thy most cleansing blood;
Increase our faith and love, that we may know
The hope and peace which from Thy presence flow.

The Full Text

Thee we adore, O hidden Savior, Thee,
Who in Thy sacrament dost deign to be;
Both flesh and spirit at Thy presence fail,
Yet here Thy presence we devoutly hail.

O blest memorial of our dying Lord,
Who living Bread to men doth here afford!
O may our souls forever feed on Thee,
And Thou, O Christ, forever precious be.

Fountain of gladness, Jesu, Lord and God,
Cleanse us, unclean, with Thy most cleansing blood;
Increase our faith and love, that we may know
The hope and peace which from Thy presence flow.

O Christ, whom now beneath a veil we see,
May what we thirst for soon our portion be,
To gaze on Thee unveiled, and see Thy face,
The vision of Thy glory and Thy grace.

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